Stage Six: Preparation

Liquidation of the ghettos.

Liquidation of the ghettos.

The Jews are identified and separated out because of their religious identity. Death lists are created and the segregation of Jews becomes very clear. The Jews are forced to leave their homes and move into ghettos where a large number of Jews are contained. They are told that they may bring as much items they own as they can possibly hold to help ease their transition into their new community. Once they arrived at their destination, each family was forced to share a tiny room with other Jews. The homes they left behind were given to Nazi officials and German soldiers to occupy, needless of consent. A crucial step towards genocide has begun as the Nazis stockpiled weapons and prepared methods for killing in mass numbers. Concentration camps and death camps are built and the extermination of the Jews was almost possible. After being given minimal time to settle in, the Jews registered to the officials on site to determine their futures. Skilled workers such as welders and metal polishers were sent to factories to work while others who were incapable or possessed education that could pose the Nazis trouble were sent to concentration camps. Other victims were deported to famine-struck regions for starvation. By now, personal belongings no longer existed and liquidation in the ghetto has already taken place.

Preparing for genocide requires massive stockpiles of weapons and materials. The public should be aware of this by now but nothing is done to help prevent the near future. Anti-Semitism continues to impact how people think on the entire situation and results in millions of lives lost. This essentially displays how the public no longer concerns themselves with the Jews and allows violations against humanity to continue.

 

Stage Seven: Extermination

Jews were lined up and shot by German soldiers, only to fall into a pit full of dead bodies.

Jews were lined up and shot by German soldiers, only to fall into a pit full of dead bodies.

Map of all concentration and death camps.

Map of all concentration and death camps.

At this stage, the extermination of Jews quickly becomes reality and the mass killing is legally called “genocide.” When genocide is sponsored by the state, its armed forces work with militias to do the killing. Death camps that have been established held young men, women, children, and anyone else that could not provide the Nazis with labor. Large showers that spread “Zyklon-B,” a cyanide-based pesticide were used as the primary killing methods. Those who could work were sent to concentration camps to help the war efforts. The Nazis had already possessed knowledge to how long an individual could work before their body started to breakdown. Once it reached that limit, they would be executed.

The systematic plot designed by the Nazis shows how each person played a role in achieving the “Final Solution.” Because the Nazis did not consider the Jews as a person, their bodies were mutilated, buried in mass graves or burnt. At this last stage of genocide, only rapid and overwhelming armed intervention can stop genocide. The Allies were aware to an extent what was happening to the Jews in Germany but only chose to get involved after invading the western hemisphere. Selfish intents are seen from the very beginning and if they had reacted sooner, much of this could have been prevented.

Stage Eight: Denial

A furnace used for burning the bodies of all victims

A furnace used for burning the bodies of all victims

Denial is the stage that follows after all genocides. The Nazis spent a lot of time trying to cover up the evidence to make it look like nothing had happened. The digging of mass graves and burning of corpses are just a few examples of this and that such crimes were even committed would be denied. The Nazis blamed others for what happened to the victims, even the victims themselves. Accompanied by excuses, the Nazis tried to mitigate and avoid what they committed was in fact genocide. Most genocide occurs during a war so they relied on hiding behind that fact. The only way to achieve justice through denial is punishment by an international tribunal. Some German citizens claimed to not know anything and some denied the involvement of the genocide at the Nuremberg Trials. The creation of the term “genocide” in 1948 and the Nuremberg Trials proved to be essential in ensuring that such crimes should be acknowledged and not forgotten to help prevent future genocides.